Tuesday, August 12, 2008

GARY SMITH - PERSIMMON , CHINABERRY SEEDS IN SEATTLE SPROUTED

Hi Hiroshi,

It looks like I was a bit premature when I sent you the first picture from my camera phone. I have twins! There are two persimmon seedlings! And one chinaberry seedling popped up, also!

I plan on making one persimmon tree trained as an espalier and the other is going to my friend's mother's home in California.

I'm not sure, but I think the chinaberry will either be planted in an estate garden or a local park or I may just keep it as a dwarf tree in a pot. If I do give it away, I will make sure the Hibaku Tree Project is credited with your name attached.

Gary

5/25/2008 Persimmons

5/25/2008 Chinaberry


5/14/2008 Persimmons

Sunday, June 29, 2008

AN EXPO of HIBAKU TREE PROJECT with new sprouts at EXPLORATION ACADEMY, BRONX, NY

Fri 6/27/2008


Hi Hiroshi & Suzanne
Taihen omachidoo sama deshita
It's a loooooooooooooooong story
But I finally have the photos for you.
We had a little EXPO @ school and I created a display to showcase our work to the school.
"hope you have awonderful summer & I hope we cross paths sooner than later
yoroshiku !!
Judith Malo yori


Thursday, May 22, 2008

HIBAKU GINKGO TREE IN ELEPHANT FOOT FOR "SOUND OF MUSIC" AT NYU



















THE SOUND OF MUSIC

War, beauty, and survival

Vanessa Albury, Jesse Bransford, Jacob Cohen, Mila Geisler, Pamela Jue, Caroline Polachek, Max Razdow, Hiroshi Sunairi

Curated by Jan Van Woensel

During the Cold War, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) planned to broadcast The Sound of Music on radio in the event of a nuclear strike on the United Kingdom. The show would be part of an emergency timetable of programs designed to "reassure" the public in the aftermath of the attack.

An altered, simplified and popular version of the life of Maria Augusta von Trapp (1905 – 1987) is depicted in the 1965 movie musical The Sound of Music. In Salzburg, Austria, before the outbreak of the Second World War, Maria wedded naval commander Georg Ritter von Trapp. Partly due to strong economic pressures from Germany, the family lost their fortune in 1935. To survive, the Trapps sent away most of their servants, moved into the top floor of their house, and rented the empty rooms to students of the Catholic University. The family began turning its love of music into a career. After performing at a festival, they became a popular touring act. Shortly after the Nazi annexation of Austria in 1938, and topped by the Nazi pressure on Georg to join the Third Reich’s Kriegsmarine, the family escaped to Italy and then to the United States. *

As a primary source of inspiration for the exhibition, the adventures of The Sound of Music symbolize family, protection, the great evil, survival, and romance. The exhibition explores how concepts of disruption (global and domestic, collective and personal,) beauty and survival inspire a selection of American, or in America living artists.















Hiroshi Sunairi
is originally from Hiroshima, Japan. His recent body of works focuses predominantly on the slow process of healing after times of great disaster such as the dropping of the atomic bombs at the end of World War II, and 9/11. Sunairi’s Hibaku Tree Project is an ongoing project celebrating the Gingko tree, the second generation of the tree that survived the atomic bombing. The artist gives seedlings of the tree to people in the United States, inviting them to plant and take care of the growing tree. Hereby, Sunairi’s project introduces feelings of harmony, guilt, and remembrance between two nations. The Hibaku tree in The Sound of Music is a gift to Nancy Barton, chair of the department of art and art professions at NYU.

HIBAKU GINKGO TREE IN ELEPHANT FOOT FOR "NEOINTEGRITY" AT DEREK ELLER GALLERY, NY


EXPLORATION ACADEMY, BRONX, NY AND BERKLEY CARROLL HIGH SCHOOL, BROOKLYN, NY - GINKGO, PERSIMMONS, CICAD, CHINABERRY SEEDS PLANTED

RESPONDING TO Making a Home

http://www.japansociety.org/student_exhibition_responding_to_making_a_home

Ginkgo Tree Grows in Brooklyn, the article

Works by students from Explorations Academy and The Berkeley Carroll School

partnership between Japan Society and students at Explorations Academy in the Bronx and The Berkeley Carroll School in Brooklyn.

In this multi-program, high school students from both schools investigated selected cultural, technical and art historical topics related to the Japan Society Gallery exhibition Making a Home: Japanese Contemporary Artists in New York. This included analysis of representations of “home,” a critical examination of references to specific aspects of Japanese culture evidenced in selected works and an exploration of identity construction in the artists and themselves.

Students began their study of Making a Home at school with a preview and introductory discussion of the themes of the exhibition led by Japan Society educators Suzanne de Vegh and Victoria Moller. This was followed by a visit to the Japan Society Gallery where they received a tour of Making a Home with the exhibition’s curator, Eric C. Shiner and participated in facilitated gallery lessons. Hiroshi Sunairi, an artist included in Making a Home visited Berkeley Carroll and Explorations Academy and facilitated a studio art project

In the studio art project each student chose an iconic symbol to represent a personal ideal or aspiration and guided by Hiroshi Sunairi made a clay vessel in that shape. On Tuesday, January 22nd, the students will return to Japan Society to plant the seeds of hibaku trees (seeds from trees that survived the atomic bombing of Hiroshima in 1945) in their vessels as part of a larger long term peace project.

By planting hibaku tree seeds in vessels of their own making, it is our hope that the students will connect the rich symbolism of the hibaku trees (strength, endurance, resiliency, renewal) with the personal power of their own dreams and goals.

Program Participants:

Explorations Academy


Amber Anderso
Ava Loi Anderson
Darrin Barker
Kyle Castro
Tori Edwards
Ashlee Ford
Terry Lawson
Shikeena Palmer
Loreyne Perez
Rafael Pina
Tennelle Swan
Awilda Torres

Maurice Washington

The Berkeley Carroll School

Jason Aerni
Rebecca Brown
Sabrina Greig
Madison Hickson
Jonathan Kohana
Montana Lampert-Hoover
Valerie Schafran
Julia Schechter
Will Trigg
Daniel Wahl

Special thanks to:

Japan Society Gallery
Robert Fish, Director of Education & Lecture Programs, Japan Society
Judith Malo, Japanese Language Teacher, Explorations Academy
Eric C. Shiner, Curator, Making a Home: Japanese Contemporary Artists in New York
Hiroshi Sunairi, Artist; Professor in the Department of Art & Art Professions, NYU

Lorne Swarthout, U.S. History Chair, The Berkeley Carroll School

VANESSA ALBURY AND HER GRAND PARENTS - Chinese parasol tree (Firmiana simplex) AND GINKGO TREE



NANCY BARTON - GINKGO TREE IN UPSTATE NEW YORK


SATORU EGUCHI - Chinese parasol tree (Firmiana simplex) IN NEW YORK




July 2009 update of Chinese Parasol Tree from 2006 Tree Project!
It looks so healthy!!

LEEMA YAMADA - Chinese parasol tree (Firmiana simplex) IN LOS ANGELES




LINDA VEGA - GINKGO TREE IN CONNECTICUT


THE HAPPY END 17 - Alberto and new Hibaku Ginkgo seeds in Argentina

Dear Hiroshi / Adriana First gingko seed seems now showing the first hint of a sprout today august 9 th . It is white, so I do n...